The Funeral Disruption Industry in Australia

I am proud to be here in Lisbon at the ESHMS conference “Old Tensions, Emerging Paradoxes in Health Rights Knowledge, and Trust”.

I have two presentations: ohne about EOL Doulas and their role in providing ongoing death literacy and continuity of care for clients, the other (a distributed paper) on disruption and tbe corporate funeral model in Australia.

My distributed papet abstract is on pages 74-75 of the program book. I feel so proud, this is a great accomplishment.

What Can Your Home Funeral Look Like?

There is a lovely article here about one woman’s experience of vigilling with her partner, Benjamin, and keeping Benjamin’s body at home for three days before transporting him to a crematorium.

Although the terminology and frameworks are USA-centric, the essentials are pretty much the same here in Australia. You do not need to employ a funeral director unless you wish to, and you may keep a body at home for up to five days legally.

If you are interested in exploring what your home-based End Of Life, vigilling, and after-death body care and funeral choices and options are, please do get in touch. I am available for consultation and for hire as an End Of Life Doula.

Let’s talk

Informal carers, the cared-for, and how an End Of Life Doula can benefit both.

ScottWilliamsTEDSpeaker


This TED talk  by Scott Williams (pictured above), considers the importance of unpaid carers, how much carers boost the economy (there are Australian figures in this talk), and how essential the role and work of a carer is not just to society, but for the person who is cared for. The role of carer is one that is quite familiar to many, many members of our communities – but we may be frequently isolated within that role, or not well-versed in articulating that we are carers (particularly when the role has slowly changed and  increased over time. If you are caring for someone at their End Of Life, or if you yourself are at End Of Life and would like to better understand compassionate communities and how to more effectively communicate your needs around caring, an End Of Life Doula may be just what you need.
In our multi-tasking 21st century lives, having someone to focus on the way a compassionate community of carers and supporting, loving people interact together can be the perfect stress-reduction factor. End Of Life Doulas provide a sympathetic ear, an objective and compassionate set of problem-solving skills, and in my case a background as a psychotherapist and counsellor which is useful when carers/ network members may be tired, emotional, distressed or overwhelmed.
 
End Of Life Doulas like myself often act as negotiators and communication hubs for those around someone at End Of Life, passing along information, doing research, translating medical-speak when needed, helping to arrange schedules and/or helping friends and family to better understand how to plan time and activities more effectively to fit in with busy lifestyles. 
 
I am an End Of Life Doula who can facilitate communications amongst and between carers and the cared-for, help you build a more supportive network of support, help you better understand your advance planning choices, and be a proactive member of your End Of Life community.
 
Let’s talk.

Sensible advice for holding your boundaries

It is often difficult when we are ill, stressed, overwhelmed, or any combination of these, to remember that is is perfectly fine to say ‘no’ when we need to. During End Of Life – our own, or that of someone close to us – it is particularly sensible to hold strong boundaries, and to refuse information or inappropriate actions from those around us. Even when they mean well.

A useful set of parameters is provided here – and although the article is written by an oncologist and is focused on those living with a cancer diagnosis, the parameters laid out translate well to other illnesses and diagnoses.

An End Of Life Doula can be a great asset in helping you to navigate your treatment choices and options, construct the compassionate community that will serve you best in your own personal circumstances, and to help you hold the boundaries in place when that help is needed or requested by you.

Let’s talk.